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THIS is WHY Most Americans Are ASLEEP

from SGT Report:

It’s no secret to folks who follow the work of John Taylor Gatto that public schools in the United States amount to little more than state funded indoctrination camps at this point. The fact of the matter is, PUBLIC SCHOOLS SUCK and it’s the reason why million of Americans remain sound asleep. Brett Veinotte from SchoolSucksProject.com joins me to discuss.

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9 comments to THIS is WHY Most Americans Are ASLEEP

  • John

    Free ebook “The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America” covers the history of 20th century education reform, led by the Rockefeller and Carnegie foundations:

    “In our dream, we have limitless resources, and the people yield themselves with perfect docility to our molding hand… We shall not try to make these people or any of their children into philosophers or men of learning or of science…”

    — Frederick Gates, Rockefeller General Education Board, 1913

    http://deliberatedumbingdown.com/

    • anon

      +1, John. And, man, did they ever succeed. It now takes years, if not a DECADE or more, to piece (most, but certainly not) all the pieces of the puzzle together. THANK GOD, for the Internet! Once it became possible for a person to buy a PC (personal computer) ~ that was a “game-changer”. I think there are likely far more people truly awake today, than there ever have been, which is partly due to the U.S. (and global) population having grown so much over the past 3,4,5 decades. (With more people on the planet, of course the number of those paying attention will increase). Still, I think the Internet has played the biggest role, in so many having “awakened”. People aren’t all stupid, or mentally-challenged. They just lack critical information, and the critical thinking skills that they were never taught in school, unless they had the good fortune to take say, a Journalism class, in which they were taught the rudiments of the TRIVIUM (Who? What? When? Where? Why? And, How?) As to HOW “awakened” they all are ~ that is a different story. There is a learning curve ~ and, a person has to be able to keep an open mind, in order to overcome all the programming and actually uncover the truth.

  • anon

    You also have to consider, that the Western “elite” control EVERYTHING in ‘the West’:

    1. TBTF/TBTJ Banks & Oil, & Weapons Manufacturing Corporations (among others)
    2. Governments (and way too many three-letter quasi-governmental agencies)
    3. Intelligence Services (MI6, CIA, Mossad, foremost among them)
    4. Pentagon (as well as other Western Militaries in the “EU”)
    5. Mainstream Media
    6. K-University “Education” (Indoctrination) System
    7. Last but certainly not least ~ the Western LEGAL SYSTEM.

    Since they control EVERYTHING, it makes it much easier for them to keep the “sheeple” in the dark. Just investigate the JFK Assassination, or 9/11, for starters. They just keep omitting the critical info, which causes MOST average Americans to NEVER figure out what actually happened during their ENTIRE lifetimes. Unless others make an effort to actually educate them.

  • anon

    8. Secret Societies (How could I forget to mention them?)

    In related news:

    Zionist Jews Happily Brag About Being At The Center Of The Muslim Invasion Of Europe
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wk25AeFWMNs

    3 groups of Americans that are serving “Jew”-ish Interests: 1) Socialists/Communists, 2) ZIONIST “Christians”, and 3) FREEMASONS. (Communism, Zionism, and (Modern, Speculative) Freemasonry (est. 1717, London) are ALL “Jew”-ish.

  • Craig Escaped Detroit

    Yes, it is SAD that America has so many clueless sheeple. Dumbed down, druggies, alcoholics, millennials, etc etc.

    When DuhMerrikka, KanaDUH, & ‘Yer-up’ become the new Venezuela, things are likely to happen TOO fast to start working on a garden, or it may be the wrong time of year for it.

    If the worst happens, then large cities & suburbs of the world will experience a “thinning of the herd”.

    The human “gene pool” is gonna get a big chlorine shock treatment to clear the waters.

    When the Darwin arrives, only the preppers will thrive.

    The idiots will wake up to find a knife in their chests.

    • Ed_B

      @Craig

      “When DuhMerrikka, KanaDUH, & ‘Yer-up’ become the new Venezuela, things are likely to happen TOO fast to start working on a garden, or it may be the wrong time of year for it.”

      Indeed so, which is why it is very useful to learn how to grow plants indoors as well as out of doors. Building a small greenhouse will extend the growing season by a couple of months and that extra growing time could very well make the difference between surviving and not or between surviving and thriving.

      I like to sprout plants indoors to give them a running start in the growing season. Growing potatoes in a 5-gallon bucket is also an interesting experiment that most can try. A few of these can add nicely to anyone’s available food supply, especially during the winter.

      I’ve also used plastic mortar trays to grow various things, like radishes, peas, beets, and peppers. They work well for this, even if they are not very deep. These should also work well for bush beans, although I have not tried that. I like to mound up the soil I use so that when it settles, there is still plenty for the plants.

      A tomato plant in a bucket also works well, is decorative, and can be very productive if located near a window on the sunny side of your house. The cherry and grape varieties work best for this but larger ones, such a Romas, can be grown too.

      • Craig Escaped Detroit

        @Ed_B,
        Great tips…THANKS.
        Potatoes in a bucket, barrel, old tires (filling tires with dirt and growing taters, does NOT work where the the climate is too warm because the tires can heat up TOO much and prevent potatoes from growing, but where it’s a bit chilly, the tires warm up the soil just right.

        Growing things in trays on the windowsill is great.

        I’m ordering a variety of seeds from these guys, they have some great BULK prices, such as POUND of Broccoli seeds LESS than $10. (they market some of this stuff as “sprouting seeds” for microgreens). You can sprout seeds and quickly have food ready, in just a couple WEEKS. Sprouting BEANS also is great, and increases their nutrient values.

        Lettuces, radishes, and other sprouting things, can grow quickly enough, and in a small space, to supply food during and emergency, or for eating just because you like it like this.

        I read somewhere, that growing/sprouting leafy foods, can supply an adult with enough food to survive, with just the relatively small space of just a couple hundred square feet. (as opposed to regular garden that may have to be 1000-4000 sq-ft to supply one person.)

        Other sites, claim you can supply one adult, all year, with just 250sq-ft, but that will be some very intensive gardening.

        http://seeds.toddsseeds.com/calabrese-broccoli-microgreen-sprouting-seeds/

        I’m going to order a POUND of Marigold Flower seeds ($22) and split the order with my neighbor. These are the flowers that repel garden PESTS, you plant them near the stems of your valuable veggies, and also around the sides of your rows, etc.

        STAY AWAY from things that screw up your plants…such as PEAT MOSS GROWING-starter pots BECAUSE they really don’t break down well and they RESTRICT the roots and your plants will not thrive!!!

        Also stay away from those compressed Peat moss starter “cookies” (pellets), because they are made with a little cloth fabric MESH around them, to hold them together, BUT, that mesh also restricts the ROOTS. If you use these, make SURE you CUT off or remove the little mesh before you plant these, and then things will be OK.

        It’s just faster, easier to use those seed starter trays (72 cells & a greenhouse top cover).

        Commercial growers don’t use the Peat-pots for the reasons stated. They use plastic, reusable pots, and YOU should too.

        Buying stacks of plastic drink cups, or foam coffee cups are a good choice. Just poke a hole thru the bottoms for drainage. You’ll be able to reuse these many times.

        Buy a roll of fence, some cheap stuff, but stiff enough to act as a TRELLIS, so you can make a 1/2 hoop/archway over some of your crops, for several different tricks.

        You can lay plastic sheet over it, to make an instant “cold frame” or mini green house, or you can lay “bug cloth barrier” to keep the insects off. Bird netting. And the fence will keep the cats and bunnies out a lot better if you also close the ends.

        But, you can pick up your VINE plants onto the trellis and allow you to plant other things right next to those vine veggies.

        I picked up some cheap, smaller tomato cages, and will use them to raise my cucumber vines off the ground BUT… BUT BUT BUT… cucumber vines (squash, etc) will KILL themselves if you don’t put some kind of PADDING under the vine as it hangs down across the wire!!! It gets “PINCHED” and dies without something to make a gentle transition over the wire. Squash is TOO heavy to hang over like this, but a TRELLIS (fence) will support heavier veggies!

        I’m going to be planting (these next few days), more plants, but I’ll be experimenting with growing PEA PODS, or other “legumes” next to MANY of my plants, trying to add (automatic) nitrogen to them (from the legume roots). Just like the famous “THREE SISTERS METHOD” of growing CORN & climbing beans together, with squash in between them to act as mulch.

        I’m gonna put the climbing legumes onto my cucumbers that I lift onto the tomato cages… but probably not 100%, just in case the climbers put too much shade on the leaves.

        If you download and print some websites about “COMPANION PLANTING” & also “interplanting”, and CROP ROTATION, you’ll avoid some serious mistakes AND you won’t have to worry about a power outage killing your access to that data if you PRINT a HARD COPY!!!

        I’ve learned from those charts/tables, that some veggies do NOT like to be grown next to specific things. Such as Asparagus will conflict near potatoes, onions, or other crops.

        Why? It’s partly because every plant, puts out some tiny chemicals into the soil, and alters the local bacteria, as well as “plant chemicals” that are some form of ‘communication’ between them. It’s really strange stuff.

        I’m gonna be growing quite a few “cherry tomatoes” because they seem to survive pests and birds without all getting poked or eaten. Tomato worms (those BIG green caterpillars, are FAST. One day you wont see any, and a day or two later, they’re using your plants like a buffet table.)

        There are tricks, like wrapping some aluminum foil around the base-stem of your squash plants, to prevent the squash boring larvae from getting into the base of your squash vines and killing them.

        Other moths, worms, etc, lay eggs onto the silks of corn cobs, and eat their way into your corn, but some people, put a few drops of mineral oil onto the top of the cob, and prevent or reduce this worm problem, but you’ll have some discolored kernels at the top, just cut if off before cooking.

        Buy a BIG bag of agricultural grade “D.E.”, apply to the soil, and use a bunch of it, in a lawn & leaf blower, to dust your crops with this stuff, and it will abrasively grind BEETLES, grasshoppers and stink bugs to death. Non toxic form of bug control for HARD BODIED insects. No effects on soft bodies, such as worms, slugs, etc.

        Onions, garlic, fennel, dill, and others are also known to repel certain bugs.

  • pippi

    Make America Think Again

    • Ed_B

      Now THAT will be a challenge! As Henry Ford once said, “Thinking is about the hardest work there is. Maybe that’s why so few engage in it”.

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