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The Curious Case of Vanishing Lady Liberty; Only Gold and Silver Remember Her

from Money Metals:

The very first word anyone ever saw on a circulating United States coin was the word “LIBERTY.”

From half-cents to silver dollars, each featured the likeness of an unnamed woman. The images varied, thanks to different engravers, but together they became recognized as Lady Liberty.

Many, maybe most, of young America’s citizens were illiterate. “Liberty” may have been the first word they ever learned to read.

If not, they surely knew her face. The Revolutionary War for them was not ancient history.

Liberty 1794 Half Dime: The Founding Fathers knew all gold, silver, and copper is sound money and didn’t mind that American coinage circulated alongside colonial and foreign coins depicting kings and queens.

But Lady Liberty alone belonged to the United States. Her anonymous image spoke plainly to a cornerstone of human freedom – private wealth – in your hands, belonging to you, no counter-party strings attached.

After all, her picture was right there on the money!

Her looks would change with the fashions and the times, as she graced most gold and silver American coins for 154 years. She was variously adorned with the arrows of war, the shield of readiness, or the garlands of commerce and trade.

Then, almost unnoticed over just a few years, Lady Liberty began to vanish.

The U.S. government and the Federal Reserve presided over the poverty and debt of the 1930’s Great Depression, stealing employment and financial liberty from one of every four Americans. Lady Liberty also paid a price.

America’s bedrock gold coinage was obliterated in 1933 by Franklin Roosevelt’s confiscation order, sending millions of Lady Liberty’s gleaming images to be melted down.

She had already been quietly removed from the quarter-dollar in 1930, making room for George Washington’s 200th birthday celebration.

She vanished again from public view when the iconic silver dollar was discontinued in 1935.

When she was minted on the last Winged Liberty dime (1916-1945), it marked a sad chapter in the curious case of the vanishing Lady Liberty.

The Winged Liberty was never intended to depict a Roman deity.

Nevertheless, Americans confused the design with Mercury, a mythological patron of commerce. The name stuck, leaving us with the “Mercs” we stack today in bags and rolls of 90% silver.

The model for Winged Liberty was a woman, Elsie Stevens, a friend of the coin’s engraver – not a male deity. But in the public’s mind, the coin was never known as a “liberty dime,” although that’s exactly what it was.

The one mistake a klutzy U.S. government did not make was to model American coinage after Greco-Roman gods.

But it was no bureaucratic mistake to ditch Lady Liberty to make convenient, political statements.

After FDR’s death in 1945, plans to honor him included kicking Lady Liberty off the dime – an easy bureaucratic pick given FDR’s ham-handed treatment of both gold and individual freedoms, and a war-weary public that never recognized that image of Liberty anyway.

Ben Franklin replaced Walking Liberty on the half dollar (1948) as subtle, political payback for FDR’s dime. The mint’s director studied and loved Franklin. She knew Ben philosophically opposed every policy of FDR.

Murdered President John Kennedy was honored on the half dollar in 1964, struck in 90% silver. JFK’s bitter enemy, Lyndon Johnson, took pleasure later that year in annihilating circulating silver coinage. JFK lasted one year on a 90% coin.

The conspiracy to finish off gold, silver, and Lady Liberty was now complete. Pocket change became nothing more than a home for politically selected historical figures. And intrinsically worthless at that.

We’re quite sure Washington, Franklin, and even JFK wouldn’t have traded Lady Liberty to have their own images on worthless, mystery metal coins. We can’t vouch for FDR.

The word “liberty” is still there on the coins in your pocket, but her image – a vanished vestige of American freedom – is found only, and appropriately, in bullion patterns, both government and privately minted.

The Walking Liberty half dollar design graces the U.S. one-ounce silver round. Saint Gauden’s $20 Liberty found a home on the gold one-ounce and its fractionals.

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1 comment to The Curious Case of Vanishing Lady Liberty; Only Gold and Silver Remember Her

  • MEFOBILLS

    The revolutionary war was actually funded by Continentals “washington’s money.” Thomas Paine, “The continental was the cornerstone of the revolution.”

    The continental only went “bad” after the British counterfeited them in great volume; this as a war method.
    to pay
    Bank of England became debt the first debt spreading institution to control a country, and was established in 1694.

    Franklin explains in his writings, that being forced to use BOE banknotes was central to the revolution. BOE and England also required that imbalance in trade be settled with Gold.

    In other words, the colonial people were forced to stop using script, and to accept british debt money. At the same time, Britian (BOE) was absorbing gold flows from the colonials, in their great game.

    This maneuvering by Britain caused unemployment in the Colonies to soar, and was the main reason for the war.

    People that shill about gold coins and metal, etc. are casting hypnotic confusion about monetary history.

    The plain fact is that metal is not money; debt instruments are not money either.

    Saying metal is money, is like saying that math is metal. It is preposterous.

    Metal gets its legal value by its stamp.

    Money’s true nature is law. The best form of money is volume and channel controlled to match goods and services production.

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