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Bankers Push “New Global Monetary Order” That Would Hold Nations Hostage

by Brandon Smith, via SHTF Plan:

I have said it many times in the past — when elitist criminals start openly admitting to their schemes it means that they are ready to pull the plug on the current system. They simply don’t care anymore who knows their plans because they think that victory is inevitable.

There have been more subtle and less prominently published calls for a “new world order” in the past, to be sure. However, at no other time have I seen international financiers and their puppet political mouthpieces so brazen about calling for global centralization than in the wake of the successful Brexit referendum. It is as if the Brexit flipped a switch in the existing narrative and set loose a flood of new propaganda, all aimed at convincing the general public that central banks must combine forces and act as one institution in order to combat an economic crisis that isn’t even visible to laymen yet.

Though I predicted the activation of this propaganda campaign in my article “Brexit: Global Trigger Event, Fake Out Or Something Else?,” published before the referendum vote took place, the speed at which it is developing is truly astonishing.

Now, under the current circumstances of the previous week’s market rally post-Brexit (driven by hopes of central bank intervention and extremely low trading volume) one would think that the globalist calls for total centralization of financial policy management don’t make much sense. Where is this “crisis” that the bankers keep warning about?

As I outlined in great detail in recent articles, I believe the Brexit to be a partial trigger event for a future market disaster that has been engineered for many years. That is to say, a worldwide financial calamity has been deliberately staged in advance, and the Brexit is meant to act as a scapegoat for it. The fundamentals of the global economy have been increasingly negative since 2008, and the only “indicator” left to appear positive has been stocks.

There are plenty of people out there who assume that equities have escaped without consequence after the UK referendum because of the pre-4th of July rally. However, I would suggest they not get too comfortable with the hollow low volume spike in stocks at this early stage.

These kinds of rallies should not be a surprise. They were common during the derivatives and credit crash that struck in 2008 after Bear Sterns and Lehman. Ultimately, stocks are an irrelevant faith driven indicator, and the fundamentals will always win in the end.

As Forbes notes in a surprisingly honest analysis — the “Lehman moment” of 2008 was not really a “moment” at all. The derivatives crash was driven by numerous frailties within the debt bubble structure; Lehman was just a higher profile element of a more chaotic mess. When Lehman’s bankruptcy went public, equities took a considerable dive, rather similar in velocity to that which occurred right after the Brexit referendum. But, only a week later stocks had rallied back near the exact highs seen before Lehman had folded.

The psychology of market investors is to always first go with what they are familiar with and what they have been conditioned to do, much like Pavlovian dogs. Investors today, as then, were conditioned to “buy the dip no matter what”. Of course, once reality and the fundamentals set in, stocks were back in free-fall only two weeks later.

The Brexit is not going away, and the negative effects it heralds are still barely visible to the mainstream. This process is going to be actively weighing on the markets for months as investors continue to lose their blind faith in the system. We haven’t even begun the party yet, and this is assuming there are no other catalyzing moments around the corner.

Read More @ SHTFPlan.com

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