The Phaserl


How to Survive a Personal Economic Collapse

by Daisy Luther, The Organic Prepper:

With all that is being written about the economic collapses of nations around the globe, people in America seem to be waiting for some huge event.

But what if it isn’t a huge event like a stock market crash or a currency collapse that you actually need to be concerned about? What if our disaster starts out looking nothing like the economic crises in Argentina, Venezuela or Greece? What if the real financial disaster in the future is more personal? What, if that financial disaster has already happened?

It’s here and it’s not what anyone expected.

Despite the lack of fanfare in the media, for many North Americans, the collapse is here. In homes across the country, the struggle to survive has already begun. And it isn’t what you think. This isn’t relegated to only lower income neighborhoods. As an article from a Cinncinnati new station stated, “Hunger doesn’t know a zipcode.”

For many people who were formerly financially comfortable, the economic collapse has already happened, in the form of a job loss, hours that have been cut back due to Obamacare requirements for employers, an exorbitant medical bill or other crushing debt, or simply an inflation rate that has outstripped your pay increases. Despite all of the warnings, many people are still going to be absolutely blindsided.

For many families, personal finances have reached a catastrophic level – they are left to make terrible choices:

Which utility can I live without?
Should I walk away from my mortgage?
Should I eat something so I can work harder or should I skip meals so my kids have food?
Should I use the grocery money to take my child to the doctor or should I wait and hope he/she improves without medical intervention?
Do I risk the IRS-enforced penalties by forgoing enrollment in Obamacare or should I skip that whole grocery shopping thing so I can pay the monthly premiums and enormous deductibles in order to stay in the government’s good graces?

These are the kind of decisions that people across the nation are grappling with every day. And it’s not the people who you’d expect that are having these problems.

I’m talking about good people, hardworking men and women who have always been employed and paid their bills. A personal financial crisis does not just strike those stereotypical “welfare queens” with the long manicured nails, Gucci knock-off purse, and a grocery cart full of EBT-funded lobster.

I’m talking about the person next door, who seems to have it all together. I’m talking about that quiet family that sits two rows in front of you at church. I’m talking about that two-income family with two children and a car in the driveway that takes them to work and school 5 days a week. I’m talking about people just like you and me.

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