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The Mississippi River Is Drying Up

from Michael Snyder,, Activist Post


The worst drought in more than 50 years is having a devastating impact on the Mississippi River. The Mississippi has become very thin and very narrow, and if it keeps on dropping there is a very real possibility that all river traffic could get shut down. And considering the fact that approximately 60 percent of our grain, 22 percent of our oil and natural gas, and and one-fifth of our coal travel down the Mississippi River, that would be absolutely crippling for our economy.

It has been estimated that if all Mississippi River traffic was stopped that it would cost the U.S. economy 300 million dollars a day. So far most of the media coverage of this historic drought has focused on the impact that it is having on farmers and ranchers, but the health of the Mississippi River is also absolutely crucial to the economic success of this nation, and right now the Mississippi is in incredibly bad shape. In some areas the river is already 20 feet below normal and the water is expected to continue to drop. If we have another 12 months of weather ahead of us similar to what we have seen over the last 12 months then the mighty Mississippi is going to be a complete and total disaster zone by this time next year.

Unfortunately, vast stretches of the Mississippi are already dangerously low. The following is an excerpt from a transcript of a CNN report that aired on August 14th….

You might think this is some kind of desert just outside of Memphis. It’s not. I’m actually standing on the exposed bottom of the Mississippi River. That’s how dramatic the drought impact is being felt here. Hard to believe, a year ago we were talking about record flooding.

Read More @ Activist Post

2 comments to The Mississippi River Is Drying Up

  • Ed_B

    “If we have another 12 months of weather ahead of us similar to what we have seen over the last 12 months then the mighty Mississippi is going to be a complete and total disaster zone by this time next year.”

    Well, let’s not get too hysterical about it. Droughts come in the summer and are very often relieved by fall rains and winter snow. The Earth has been there and done that… MANY times. There are lots of cycles in nature and virtually no straight line graphs.

  • Julie

    I live in the SouthEast – near the “tail” of Alabama – we have been getting so much rain here it’s ridiculous! We can hardly find time to mow the lawn, it rains in the morning so the grass is wet. Then, by the time it starts to dry out, we have an afternoon thundershower with lots of lightning. Lather, rinse, repeat.

    For the last 3 or 4 weeks, I think we have only had a couple of short 2-3 day periods with no rain, where things could dry out a little! Other than that, it has rained SOME every day. I wish we could send some of it to the MidWest… Guess it’s too late for this year’s crops anyway.

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